Immunology

The immune system is an extremely important part of the body. It plays a role in pathologies in all the organ systems, and helps to maintain the body in homeostasis. There are a variety of cells with specific tasks, as well as loads of molecules and signals.

Click here for information about the INNATE IMMUNE SYSTEM, ADAPTIVE IMMUNE SYSTEM, MEDICAL APPLICATION OF IMMUNOLOGY, and IMMUNE SYSTEM DEFECTS.

Immunity can be broken into natural versus artificial. Natural immunity occurs when the body is infected and fights off a pathogen, maintaining memory of the pathogen in case of future infections. Artificial immunity occurs when pathogens are introduced into the body deliberately (active immunity, long-term) or when immune molecules are introduced to prevent infection (passive immunity, short-term).

Immunity can also be separated into innate and adaptive. Innate immunity involves non-specific, rapid responses through receptors with broad binding abilities. Adaptive immunity involves a slower, specific response to a pathogen using specific receptors. Adaptive immunity can be further broken into humoral, involving antibodies in serum, and cell-mediated, involving direct cellular responses.

Some Other Quick Definitions